Simply Beautiful

Have you ever looked at something and just appreciated the beauty of it’s simplicity? Not only is it visually appealing but… it just works. When you spend any time at all in antique/vintage shops, you come across one of those technological marvels almost every time. Sometimes you find one that is striking to look at from a craftsmanship or artistic point of view, but you have no idea what the heck it is or what it was used for. Why was it made in the first place? What was it like to perform the task before this item was created? It is difficult to visualize the future without appreciating and learning from the past. Almost everything we interact with today was inspired or developed from an earlier invention.
Take the buttonhook for example. A very simple device used for—you guessed it—hooking buttons. Essentially it is a tool composed of a handle, shaft and a hook at the end. The user would insert the hook through the buttonhole and capture the button by the shank and draw it through the opening. You would think that something this simple couldn’t possibly be “beautiful.”
Buttonhooks were made to suit all tastes and status levels. From handmade trench art during World War I—made from shell casings and scrap metal, to high society examples crafted in precious metals, ivory and mother of pearl, to plain wood and animal horn. Some were very ornate and others subtle and understated. They were also used as a marketing tool, advertising a local shoe repair shop or clothing store. No matter which variety you had, it was simple and made everyday life a little easier. Not convinced? Try bending over to button 10 buttons on your victorian shoes while wearing a corset.
Visit the Olde Brick House Shoppes and see what you can find. If you don’t know what it is, just ask. We are always happy to offer a little knowledge to make your shopping experience not only fun, but educational.
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